Using Data Recovery Software

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When To Use, and When Not to Use, Data Recovery Software

While data storage has grown progressively cheaper over the years, the amount of data generated has grown exponentially. The combination of these two has led to a proliferation of data drives, with most businesses completely dependent on them. As is to be expected, with so many data drives, drive failures are a common occurrence. While hard drive data recovery software can help recover lost or corrupted data in certain situations, in other circumstances the need for professional data recovery is an absolute necessity.

Broadly speaking, data loss due to software crashes can often be remedied through hard drive recovery software. As you may know, data in drives are stored in binary format – as series of 1s and 0s – in units of information called bytes. When data is accessed, the first number in the byte, whether it is 1 or 0, determines whether there is data, with 1 signifying “present” and 0 denoting “absent”.

In the event of a hard drive crash, this lead number is often erroneously changed from 1 to 0 indicating the absence of data. Thus, although the data is actually present, it becomes inaccessible. Data recovery software addresses this problem by searching the data drive for data of expected sizes, and in the event of a match, changes the lead number back to 1 from 0. This is known as logical data recovery.

However, hardware failures are not so easy to recover from. If there’s any physical damage to the disk such as through fire, water, electrical short-circuit, etc., recovery needs to be done by specialists in a controlled environment. It’s a specialized job that needs specialized skills and should not be done in-house. Without specialized data recovery services, there’s a high probability of failure and permanent loss of data.

As a rule of thumb, software crashes may be addressed by data recovery software. For physical failures, call in the certified data recovery professionals.